It's not about the books

Well it's not always about the books; it's about information and reading, whatever the format, and writing and people who read or write. But it's also quite a bit about the books.

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theatlantic:

Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring Turns 50

Fifty years ago this month The New Yorker began publishing Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. A series of three articles — excerpts from the book that would be published that September — appeared on June 16, 23, and 30, 1962. Under the banner of “A Reporter at Large,” Carson’s account of environmental peril resulting from the overabundant use of petrochemical-based pesticides unfolded between cartoons and genteel ads for airlines, tasteful upscale merchandise, hotels, and restaurants. It’s impossible for anyone not then an adult to imagine what it would have been like to read these pieces in 1962, a time when such chemicals were generally regarded as a modern miracle for home gardeners and industrial agriculture alike. “We thought these things were safe,” said my mother, who read Silent Spring as it rolled out in The New Yorker.
Reading Silent Spring today, it is disquieting to realize how much was already known in 1962 about the environmental health impacts of petrochemicals. Even more shocking is to recognize how little our regulatory response to these chemicals’ effects has changed, despite the past five decades’ great advances in scientific understanding.
Read more. [Image: Sterling College/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring Turns 50

Fifty years ago this month The New Yorker began publishing Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. A series of three articles — excerpts from the book that would be published that September — appeared on June 16, 23, and 30, 1962. Under the banner of “A Reporter at Large,” Carson’s account of environmental peril resulting from the overabundant use of petrochemical-based pesticides unfolded between cartoons and genteel ads for airlines, tasteful upscale merchandise, hotels, and restaurants. It’s impossible for anyone not then an adult to imagine what it would have been like to read these pieces in 1962, a time when such chemicals were generally regarded as a modern miracle for home gardeners and industrial agriculture alike. “We thought these things were safe,” said my mother, who read Silent Spring as it rolled out in The New Yorker.

Reading Silent Spring today, it is disquieting to realize how much was already known in 1962 about the environmental health impacts of petrochemicals. Even more shocking is to recognize how little our regulatory response to these chemicals’ effects has changed, despite the past five decades’ great advances in scientific understanding.

Read more. [Image: Sterling College/Flickr]

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    I remember when we covered Silent Spring in Lab Biology my Freshman year, I think it’s really cool that she’s from...
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    In 8th grade when everyone else was doing book reports on the easiest or funniest or whatever book, I did mine on Silent...
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